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WND's Farah: It's "Bigotry" To Protect LGBT People From Discrimination

August 09, 2013 10:33 am ET by Luke Brinker

WND founder and editor Joseph Farah attacked a San Antonio proposal to protect LGBT people from discrimination, citing language that has been removed from the proposed ordinance's text to denounce the measure as a form of "bigotry" aimed at "Bible-believing Christians and Jews."

In an August 8 column titled "When 'non-discrimination' spells bigotry," Farah accused supporters of the ordinance of "victimizing people because of their religious convictions," reprising the myth that if adopted, the measure would bar Christians and other social conservatives from office and city business contracts:

WND reported last month that the San Antonio City Council, way down in the heart of Texas, of all places, is considering a change to its "non-discrimination" ordinance that will seemingly bar those who take the Bible seriously from holding office.

In the rush to condemn "bias" of any kind, in particular discrimination against people based on their sexual proclivities and behavior, faithful, Bible-believing Christians and Jews could be permanently banned from participation in city government, business and even employment!

[...]                              

There, council members are on a path to add "sexual identity" [sic] and "sexual orientation" to the city non-discrimination ordinance, which, on the face of it, would bar anyone from office who has "demonstrated a bias" against someone based on categories that include "sexual orientation." The proposal does not define "bias," which, according to local church leaders, could mean someone who declares homosexual behavior is sinful, as the Bible clearly does.

The new ordinance would state: "No person shall be appointed to a position if the city council finds that such person has, prior to such proposed appointment, engaged in discrimination or demonstrated a bias, by word or deed, against any person, group or organization on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, veteran status, age, or disability."

Like Glenn Beck and Pastor John Hagee did earlier this week, Farah highlighted the "prior discrimination" passage as being problematic, even though it was struck from the ordinance more than two weeks ago. San Antonio's existing non-discrimination ordinance already includes such language, albeit without protections for sexual orientation and gender identity. 

In the wake of criticism from anti-gay activists, City Councilman Diego Bernal removed the "prior discrimination" section in order to refocus attention on the substance of the ordinance - prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity - rather than defending it against alarmist claims about threats to the First Amendment rights of Christians and conservatives. As Beck, Hagee, and Farah attest, however, that hasn't stopped the right wing from continuing its baseless attacks against the ordinance.

Farah contextualized the ordinance within a broader cultural movement to adopt what he believes is a dangerous "homosexual agenda":

[T]his is only the beginning. This kind of "thinking" is spreading across the country. It's easy to see how "good intentions" can lead to bad results.

It's why America's founders established a Bill of Rights. These were not "special privileges" bestowed by government. Instead, they were recognized as God-given rights. Whenever government starts handing out special protections of classes of people, especially based on their behavior, you are no longer protecting rights, you are denying them.

That's where the homosexual agenda is rapidly heading.

Previously:

Glenn Beck, Pastor John Hagee Use Discarded Language To Smear San Antonio LGBT Ordinance

"Purposeful Misinformation": How Right-Wing Media Are Smearing San Antonio's Proposed Anti-Discrimination Ordinance

Debunking The Lies About San Antonio's Proposed LGBT Non-Discrimination Ordinance