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The Jindal-Hate Group Relationship You Won't Hear About This Weekend

January 24, 2015 10:15 am ET by Carlos Maza

Louisiana Governor and GOP presidential hopeful Bobby Jindal is the keynote speaker for a rally funded and organized by an anti-LGBT group that has blamed gay people for causing the Holocaust and advocated imprisoning homosexuals.  So why isn’t his appearance garnering national media attention?

On January 24, Jindal will keynote a six-hour prayer event at Louisiana State University called “The Response: A Call To Prayer For a Nation In Crisis.” The event is sponsored and funded by the American Family Association (AFA), one of the most extreme anti-gay hate groups in the country. It’s also being staffed by a number of notorious anti-LGBT activists.

The event has drawn protests from members of the LSU community. On January 22, the Faculty Senate passed a resolution expressing displeasure with the event, and a university spokesperson has clarified that the rental of an LSU facility “does not imply any endorsement.”

Jindal has thus far dismissed criticism of the event, according to The Clarion-Ledger:

Asked if he agreed with the American Family Association's agenda, Jindal sidestepped that question and said, "The left likes to try to divide and attack Christians."

Jindal said the protesters themselves should consider joining the prayer rally. He said they "might benefit from prayer."

AFA’s status as a hate group is largely thanks to the work of its spokesman, Bryan Fischer, whose anti-LGBT remarks go well beyond mainstream social conservatism. Fischer’s inflammatory comments about gay people include:

As the Southern Poverty Law Center wrote in a 2011 report:

The AFA has been extremely vocal over the years in its opposition to LGBT rights, marriage equality and allowing gay men and lesbians to serve in the military. The group’s arguments are filled with claims that equate homosexuality with pedophilia and argue that there’s a “homosexual agenda” afoot that is set to bring about the downfall of American (and ultimately, Western) civilization.

The event is likely to attract widespread media attention – largely seen as a precursor to Jindal’s eventual presidential run. Texas Gov. Rick Perry launched his 2012 presidential bid with a similar AFA-backed “Response” prayer event in order to reach out to social conservatives. But Perry’s association with the extreme hate group wasn’t scandalous enough for major media outlets that covered the event.

And aside from a few outlets noting AFA’s “controversial” stances, national coverage of Jindal’s association with the hate group has similarly been glossed over by the media. It’s a stark contrast to the tremendous media attention surrounding GOP House Majority Whip Steve Scalise’s infamous 2002 speech to a white nationalist group. When it comes to GOP politics, media outlets have a hard time seeing what’s newsworthy about a hate group like AFA being used to cement the campaign of a potential presidential candidate. 




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